Quaternary Science Reviews caters for all aspects of Quaternary science, and includes, for example, geology, geomorphology, geography, archaeology, soil science, palaeobotany, palaeontology, palaeoclimatology and the full range of applicable dating methods. The dividing line between what constitutes the review paper and one which contains new original data is not easy to establish, so QSR also publishes papers with new data especially if these perform a review function. All the Quaternary sciences are changing rapidly and subject to re-evaluation as the pace of discovery quickens; thus the eclectic and comprehensive role of Quaternary Science Reviews keeps readers abreast of the wider issues relating to new developments in the field. Quaternary Science Reviews includes Special Issues on topical subjects arising from recent scientific meetings, in response to significant chances in Quaternary subject matter, or to acknowledge the achievements of some outstanding Quaternary Scientist.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/quaternary-science-reviews/
Impact factor
4.657 (2011)

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Surprising findings on forest fires

Lake Van in eastern Turkey is considered a unique climate archive. Several years ago, an international team of scientists led by the University of Bonn raised sediments from the bottom of the lake reflecting the past 600,000 ...

Prehistoric food globalization spanned three millennia

Since the beginning of archaeology, researchers have combed the globe searching for evidence of the first domesticated crops. Painstakingly extracting charred bits of barley, wheat, millet and rice from the remains of ancient ...

Rethinking Australia's climate history

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence of climate change that coincided with the first wave of European settlement of Australia, which effectively delivered a double-punch of drying and land clearance ...

People voyaged to Australia by boat more than 50,000 years ago

Researchers working to solve the mystery of how people first reached Australia have combined sophisticated deep sea mapping, voyage simulation techniques and genetic information to show that arrival was made by sizeable groups ...

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