Quaternary Science Reviews caters for all aspects of Quaternary science, and includes, for example, geology, geomorphology, geography, archaeology, soil science, palaeobotany, palaeontology, palaeoclimatology and the full range of applicable dating methods. The dividing line between what constitutes the review paper and one which contains new original data is not easy to establish, so QSR also publishes papers with new data especially if these perform a review function. All the Quaternary sciences are changing rapidly and subject to re-evaluation as the pace of discovery quickens; thus the eclectic and comprehensive role of Quaternary Science Reviews keeps readers abreast of the wider issues relating to new developments in the field. Quaternary Science Reviews includes Special Issues on topical subjects arising from recent scientific meetings, in response to significant chances in Quaternary subject matter, or to acknowledge the achievements of some outstanding Quaternary Scientist.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/quaternary-science-reviews/
Impact factor
4.657 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos

Scientists have reconstructed in detail the collapse of the Eurasian ice sheet at the end of the last ice age. The big melt wreaked havoc across the European continent, driving home the original Brexit 10,000 years ago.

A lost world and extinct ecosystem

Archaeological sites on the far southern shores of South Africa hold the world's richest records for the behavioral and cultural origins of our species. At this location, scientists have discovered the earliest evidence for ...

Scientists discover oldest stone tool ever found in Turkey

Scientists have discovered the oldest recorded stone tool ever to be found in Turkey, revealing that humans passed through the gateway from Asia to Europe much earlier than previously thought, approximately 1.2 million years ...

Early humans thrived in this drowned South African landscape

Early humans lived in South African river valleys with deep, fertile soils filled with grasslands, floodplains, woodlands, and wetlands that abounded with hippos, zebras, antelopes, and many other animals, some extinct for ...

Migration patterns reveal an Eden for ancient humans and animals

Home to some of the richest evidence for the behavior and culture of the earliest clearly modern humans, the submerged shelf called the Palaeo-Agulhas Plain (PAP) once formed its own ecosystem. Co-author Curtis Marean, Ph.D., ...

Hot pots helped ancient Siberian hunters survive the Ice Age

A new study shows that ancient Siberian hunters created heat resistant pots so that they could cook hot meals - surviving the harshest seasons of the ice age by extracting nutritious bone grease and marrow from meat.

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