mBio is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). ASM has been publishing microbiology research since 1916, and mBio represents ASM’s first cross-discipline, open-access publication. The scope of mBio includes all aspects of the microbiological sciences, including virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and allied fields, which may include immunology, ecology, geology, population biology, computational biology, anti-infectives and vaccines, public health, etc. mBio complements ASM’s 9 primary research journals, which serve more specific disciplines. The ASM journals program has historically provided a venue for the publication of a wide spectrum of microbiological research. ASM publishes 11 other journals that focus on narrower areas of microbiology such as bacteriology and virology. mBio was conceived (i) to offer a publication vehicle for more cutting-edge research of broader interest and (ii) to serve as a laboratory to test new publishing technologies.

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Website
http://mbio.asm.org/

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Chlamydia's covert reproduction

UF researchers have resolved a two-decade old mystery centered upon how the bacteria chlamydia divide and reproduce. Newly published results from the lab of Anthony Maurelli, a microbiologist in UF's College of Public Health ...

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers ...

Squid open up new antimicrobial drug possibilities

If you like viewing pictures of adorable animals on the internet, it's possible you've run across the Hawaiian bobtail squid, a glowing, squishy, golf-ball-sized cephalopod that prompted the Ocean Conservancy to call it the ...

Taming the wild cheese fungus

The flavors of fermented foods are heavily shaped by the fungi that grow on them, but the evolutionary origins of those fungi aren't well understood. Experimental findings published this week in mBio offer microbiologists ...

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