mBio is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). ASM has been publishing microbiology research since 1916, and mBio represents ASM’s first cross-discipline, open-access publication. The scope of mBio includes all aspects of the microbiological sciences, including virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and allied fields, which may include immunology, ecology, geology, population biology, computational biology, anti-infectives and vaccines, public health, etc. mBio complements ASM’s 9 primary research journals, which serve more specific disciplines. The ASM journals program has historically provided a venue for the publication of a wide spectrum of microbiological research. ASM publishes 11 other journals that focus on narrower areas of microbiology such as bacteriology and virology. mBio was conceived (i) to offer a publication vehicle for more cutting-edge research of broader interest and (ii) to serve as a laboratory to test new publishing technologies.

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Website
http://mbio.asm.org/

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In wild soil, predatory bacteria grow faster than their prey

Predatory bacteria—bacteria that eat other bacteria—grow faster and consume more resources than non-predators in the same soil, according to a new study out this week from Northern Arizona University. These active predators, ...

Watching cell division live

Bacteria as unicellular organisms normally reproduce by binary cell division, i.e. the duplication of the entire organism consisting of a single cell. This allows particularly rapid multiplication, such as the exponential ...

Hospital superbug traced to remote island beach

Researchers confirmed the presence in the wild of Candida auris, a multidrug-resistant fungus commonly found infesting hospitals. The findings could provide scientists insights into a pathogen that threatens inpatients, including ...

Oil-eating bacteria could help to tackle spills

A team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University has created an underwater observatory in the Faroe-Shetland Channel—and found its waters are teeming with oil-eating bacteria that could help deal with future oil spills.

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