mBio is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). ASM has been publishing microbiology research since 1916, and mBio represents ASM’s first cross-discipline, open-access publication. The scope of mBio includes all aspects of the microbiological sciences, including virology, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, and allied fields, which may include immunology, ecology, geology, population biology, computational biology, anti-infectives and vaccines, public health, etc. mBio complements ASM’s 9 primary research journals, which serve more specific disciplines. The ASM journals program has historically provided a venue for the publication of a wide spectrum of microbiological research. ASM publishes 11 other journals that focus on narrower areas of microbiology such as bacteriology and virology. mBio was conceived (i) to offer a publication vehicle for more cutting-edge research of broader interest and (ii) to serve as a laboratory to test new publishing technologies.

Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Website
http://mbio.asm.org/

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The nose of E. coli zips open and closed

With ice-cold electron microscopy microbiologists from Leiden gain more insight into how bacteria respond to their environment. Publication in mBio.

New genes out of nothing

One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. Swedish researchers now show how new genes and functions that are advantageous to bacteria can be selected from random DNA sequences. The results ...

Overfed bacteria make people sick

Since the end of the Second World War, along with the growing prosperity and the associated changes in lifestyle, numerous new and civilisation-related disease patterns have developed in today's industrialised nations. Examples ...

Symbionts as lifesavers

When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from, and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs? An international team ...

Toxin-spewing bacteria decoded

Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a central regulator of toxin production in the bacterium C. difficile, the most common cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States. C. difficile ...

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