The FASEB Journal is among the world's most cited biology journals. It is a preferred venue for the latest research reports and reviews of epigenetics, iRNA mechanics, histone acetylation, nitric oxide signaling, eicosanoid biochemistry, angiogenesis, tumor suppressor genes, apoptosis, cytoskeletal function, and human stem cell research. We publish international, transdisciplinary research covering all fields of biology at every level of organization: atomic, molecular, cell, tissue, organ, organismic and population. While we strive to include research that cuts across the biological sciences, we also consider submissions that lie within one field, but may have implications for other fields as well. We seek to publish basic and translational research, but also welcome reports of pre-clinical and early clinical research. In addition to research, review, and hypothesis submissions, we also seeks perspectives, commentaries, book reviews, and similar content related to the life sciences in its Up Front section. 

Publisher
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
History
1912 -- present
Website
http://www.fasebj.org
Impact factor
6.515 (2010)

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How cancer cells make lactic acid to survive

For the first time, researchers have shown how cancer cells reprogram themselves to produce lactic acid and to tolerate the acidic environment that exists around tumors. The finding could lead to a whole new direction for ...

Birds' blood functions as heating system in winter

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered that bird blood produces more heat in winter, when it is colder, than in autumn. The study is published in The FASEB Journal.

Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow

When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered.

Scientists use bacteria to help plants grow in salty soil

A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity.

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