eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. It is launched with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, and the Max Planck Society in November 2012. eLife represents a new model of scientific publishing, designed to meet the needs of scientists in life sciences and biomedicine in a better way. This includes free, immediate, online access to scientific articles; rapid, fair, and constructive review; and innovation in content presentation – in short, a journal for scientists, run by scientists. Initial decisions are made by eLife’s senior editors, and, if a submission is selected for further assessment, full peer review is overseen by eLife’s 175-member board of reviewing editors. The reviewing editor and reviewers consult once peer review comments are submitted, and provide a consolidated list of instructions to authors – eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming rounds of revision.

Publisher
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
Website
http://www.elifesciences.org/

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Probing how proteins pair up inside cells

Despite its minute size, a single cell contains billions of molecules that bustle around and bind to one another, carrying out vital functions. The human genome encodes about 20,000 proteins, most of which interact with partner ...

Recent algae discovery gives clues to boost biofuel production

A new study from the Michigan State University-Department of Energy (DOE) Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) shows how some algae can protect themselves when the oxygen they produce impairs their photosynthetic activity. The ...

How a contagious cancer spread among clams

A contagious blood cancer jumped from one species of clam to another and spread among clams living in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, shows a study published today in eLife.

Spoonweed plants are cold specialists from the Ice Age

As cold relics in an increasingly warming world, plants of the spoonweed group time and again quickly adapted to a changing climate during the Ice Ages of the last two million years. An international team of evolutionary ...

Crows keep special tools extra safe

Just like humans, New Caledonian crows are particularly careful when handling their most valuable tools, according to a new study by researchers from the University of St Andrews and the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior ...

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