eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. It is launched with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, and the Max Planck Society in November 2012. eLife represents a new model of scientific publishing, designed to meet the needs of scientists in life sciences and biomedicine in a better way. This includes free, immediate, online access to scientific articles; rapid, fair, and constructive review; and innovation in content presentation – in short, a journal for scientists, run by scientists. Initial decisions are made by eLife’s senior editors, and, if a submission is selected for further assessment, full peer review is overseen by eLife’s 175-member board of reviewing editors. The reviewing editor and reviewers consult once peer review comments are submitted, and provide a consolidated list of instructions to authors – eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming rounds of revision.

Publisher
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
Website
http://www.elifesciences.org/

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Naked mole rat found to defy Gompertz's mortality law

A team of researchers at Google-owned Calico Life Sciences LLC has found that the naked mole rat defies Gompertz's mortality law. In their paper published in eLife, the group describes their study of the unusual-looking rodent ...

Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA

Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and how they have ...

Study finds that parental 'memory' is inherited across generations

Are our personalities and behaviors shaped more by our genes or our circumstances? While this age-old "nature vs. nurture" question continues to confound us and fuel debates, a growing body of evidence from research conducted ...

Leaf molecules as markers for mycorrhizal associations

In nature, most plants establish mutual relationships with root fungi, so-called mycorrhiza. Mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the plants' nutrient uptake and help them thrive under extreme conditions. Researchers at the Max Planck ...

Our microbes are starving, and that's a good thing

Each of us is only half human. The other half is microbial. Trillions of viruses, fungi, bacteria and other microscopic organisms coat our skin and line our vital organs.

An evolution in the understanding of evolution

Remember domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species and Charles Darwin's "tree of life" metaphor we learned about in high school biology? That way of describing living-things lineages is just science's ...

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