eLife is a unique collaboration between funders and practitioners of research to communicate influential discoveries in the life and biomedical sciences in the most effective way. It is launched with support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Wellcome Trust, and the Max Planck Society in November 2012. eLife represents a new model of scientific publishing, designed to meet the needs of scientists in life sciences and biomedicine in a better way. This includes free, immediate, online access to scientific articles; rapid, fair, and constructive review; and innovation in content presentation – in short, a journal for scientists, run by scientists. Initial decisions are made by eLife’s senior editors, and, if a submission is selected for further assessment, full peer review is overseen by eLife’s 175-member board of reviewing editors. The reviewing editor and reviewers consult once peer review comments are submitted, and provide a consolidated list of instructions to authors – eliminating unnecessary and time-consuming rounds of revision.

Publisher
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
Website
http://www.elifesciences.org/

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Microscopic spines connect worm neurons

Dendritic "spines"—small protrusions on the receiving side of the connection (synapse) between two nerve cells—are recognized as key functional components of neuronal circuits in mammals. The shapes and numbers of spines ...

An evolution in the understanding of evolution

Remember domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species and Charles Darwin's "tree of life" metaphor we learned about in high school biology? That way of describing living-things lineages is just science's ...

A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution

There are an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 proteins at work in cells, where they carry out numerable functions, says computational molecular biologist Roman Sloutsky at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "One of the central ...

New insights into salamander limb development

A new paper by University of Kentucky researchers was recently published in the journal eLife, offering new insights and implications into the study of limb development and the evolution of vertebrate limbs.

The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go

EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene ...

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