Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Elsevier. It was first issued in January 1966 (volume 1). The listed editors are R.W. Carlson (Carnegie Institution), P. deMenocal (Columbia University), T.M. Harrison (UCLA), Y. Ricard (Université Claude Bernard), P. Shearer (UCSD), T. Spohn (German Aerospace Center), L. Stixrude (University College London). EPSL publishes original research articles cover the processes of Earth and planets generally described as physical, chemical and mechanical. The focus of further topical coverage includes geosciences such as tectonics, crust and mantle composition, and atmosphere studies of both Earth and other solar or extrasolar planets. EPSL is indexed in the following databases: The journal has a 2009 impact factor of 4.062, ranking third in the category "Geophysics & Geochemisry".

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1966-present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/503328/description
Impact factor
4.062 (2009)

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Earth's interior is cooling faster than expected

Researchers at ETH Zurich have demonstrated in the lab how well a mineral common at the boundary between the Earth's core and mantle conducts heat. This leads them to suspect that the Earth's heat may dissipate sooner than ...

Confirming liquid water beneath Martian south polar cap

A Southwest Research Institute scientist measured the properties of ice-brine mixtures as cold as -145 degrees Fahrenheit to help confirm that salty water likely exists between grains of ice or sediment under the ice cap ...

How earthquakes deform gravity

Lightning—one, two, three—and thunder. For centuries, people have estimated the distance of a thunderstorm from the time between lightning and thunder. The greater the time gap between the two signals, the further away ...

New NASA study suggests moon once had an atmosphere

A new study shows that an atmosphere was produced around the ancient Moon, 3 to 4 billion years ago, when intense volcanic eruptions spewed gases above the surface faster than they could escape to space. The study, supported ...

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