Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Elsevier. It was first issued in January 1966 (volume 1). The listed editors are R.W. Carlson (Carnegie Institution), P. deMenocal (Columbia University), T.M. Harrison (UCLA), Y. Ricard (Université Claude Bernard), P. Shearer (UCSD), T. Spohn (German Aerospace Center), L. Stixrude (University College London). EPSL publishes original research articles cover the processes of Earth and planets generally described as physical, chemical and mechanical. The focus of further topical coverage includes geosciences such as tectonics, crust and mantle composition, and atmosphere studies of both Earth and other solar or extrasolar planets. EPSL is indexed in the following databases: The journal has a 2009 impact factor of 4.062, ranking third in the category "Geophysics & Geochemisry".

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1966-present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/503328/description
Impact factor
4.062 (2009)

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