Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Elsevier. It was first issued in January 1966 (volume 1). The listed editors are R.W. Carlson (Carnegie Institution), P. deMenocal (Columbia University), T.M. Harrison (UCLA), Y. Ricard (Université Claude Bernard), P. Shearer (UCSD), T. Spohn (German Aerospace Center), L. Stixrude (University College London). EPSL publishes original research articles cover the processes of Earth and planets generally described as physical, chemical and mechanical. The focus of further topical coverage includes geosciences such as tectonics, crust and mantle composition, and atmosphere studies of both Earth and other solar or extrasolar planets. EPSL is indexed in the following databases: The journal has a 2009 impact factor of 4.062, ranking third in the category "Geophysics & Geochemisry".

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1966-present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/503328/description
Impact factor
4.062 (2009)

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Reconstructing the solar system's original architecture

As the solar system was developing, the giant planets (Jupiter and Saturn) formed very early, and as they grew, they migrated both closer to and further away from the sun to stay in gravitationally stable orbits.

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continents

Geoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas—and the exact shapes that land masses formed—have so far eluded experts.

How stony-iron meteorites form

Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific ...

Is the Earth's transition zone deforming like the upper mantle?

In a recently published paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, researchers from the Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University and the University of Lille combine numerical modeling of dislocation glide and results ...

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