Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is a weekly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Elsevier. It was first issued in January 1966 (volume 1). The listed editors are R.W. Carlson (Carnegie Institution), P. deMenocal (Columbia University), T.M. Harrison (UCLA), Y. Ricard (Université Claude Bernard), P. Shearer (UCSD), T. Spohn (German Aerospace Center), L. Stixrude (University College London). EPSL publishes original research articles cover the processes of Earth and planets generally described as physical, chemical and mechanical. The focus of further topical coverage includes geosciences such as tectonics, crust and mantle composition, and atmosphere studies of both Earth and other solar or extrasolar planets. EPSL is indexed in the following databases: The journal has a 2009 impact factor of 4.062, ranking third in the category "Geophysics & Geochemisry".

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1966-present
Website
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/503328/description
Impact factor
4.062 (2009)

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Kelp DNA records destructive power of ancient earthquake

One of the most memorable and astonishing aspects of the recent Kaikoura earthquake was the sudden uplift of the sea floor, which left populations of coastal species like kelp and shellfish literally high and dry.

Researchers examine the age of groundwater in Egyptian aquifers

Most of the water used by people in Egypt comes from the Nile River, which originates from precipitation over mountainous areas in the Ethiopian highlands. In areas far from the Nile River Valley, however, where water is ...

Precursors of a catastrophic collapse

On the morning of the 13th of March 1888, the inhabitants of the Finschhafen trading post on the east coast of New Guinea were awakened by a dull rumbling sound. An eyewitness later reported that the water in the port had ...

Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland

In recent years, glaciers near the North and South poles, as well as in mountainous areas, have been shrinking due to the effect of global warming, becoming a significant contributor to the recent sea level rise. Calving ...

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth

The discovery provides a new characteristic 'biosignature' to track the remains of ancient life preserved in rocks which are significantly altered over billions of years and could help identify life elsewhere in the Solar ...

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