Conservation biology is the scientific study of the nature and status of Earth s biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction. It is an interdisciplinary subject drawing on sciences, economics, and the practice of natural resource management. The term conservation biology was introduced as the title of a conference held at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla, California in 1978 organized by biologists Bruce Wilcox and Michael E. Soulé. The meeting was prompted by the concern among scientists over tropical deforestation, disappearing species, eroding genetic diversity within species. The conference and proceedings that resulted sought to bridge a gap existing at the time between theory in ecology and population biology on the one hand and conservation policy and practice on the other. Conservation biology and the concept of biological diversity (biodiversity) emerged together, helping crystallize the modern era of conservation science and policy. The rapid decline of established biological systems around the world means that conservation biology is often referred to as a "Discipline with a

Website
http://www.conbio.org/SCB/Publications/ConsBio/
Impact factor
4.666 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Canada conservationist warns of 'cyber poaching'

Photographers, poachers and eco-tour operators are in the crosshairs of a Canadian conservationist who warns that tracking tags are being hacked and misused to harass and hunt endangered animals.

DNA work saves fish from extinction

Flinders University scientists have created a model for conservation programs after helping to bring local populations of native pygmy perch back from extinction.

Trade in invasive plants is blossoming

Every day, hundreds of different plant species—many of them listed as invasive—are traded online worldwide on auction platforms. This exacerbates the problem of uncontrollable biological invasions.

To save the birds, look to the fish

Birds that dive for fish while wintering in the Salish Sea, located between British Columbia and Washington, are more likely to be in decline than nondiving birds with less specialized diets, according to a study led by the ...

page 1 from 13