Conservation biology is the scientific study of the nature and status of Earth s biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction. It is an interdisciplinary subject drawing on sciences, economics, and the practice of natural resource management. The term conservation biology was introduced as the title of a conference held at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla, California in 1978 organized by biologists Bruce Wilcox and Michael E. Soulé. The meeting was prompted by the concern among scientists over tropical deforestation, disappearing species, eroding genetic diversity within species. The conference and proceedings that resulted sought to bridge a gap existing at the time between theory in ecology and population biology on the one hand and conservation policy and practice on the other. Conservation biology and the concept of biological diversity (biodiversity) emerged together, helping crystallize the modern era of conservation science and policy. The rapid decline of established biological systems around the world means that conservation biology is often referred to as a "Discipline with a

Website
http://www.conbio.org/SCB/Publications/ConsBio/
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4.666 (2009)

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Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk

Nitrogen from agriculture, vehicle emissions and industry is endangering butterflies in Switzerland. The element is deposited in the soil via the air and has an impact on vegetation—to the detriment of the butterflies, ...

Linguistic and biological diversity linked

Cultural diversity—indicated by linguistic diversity—and biodiversity are linked, and their connection may be another way to preserve both natural environments and Indigenous populations in Africa and perhaps worldwide, ...

Health check upgrade for the world's wildlife

Scientists have proposed a new way to assess the health of wildlife in biodiversity hotspots, to better protect animals and bolster conservation efforts.

Tracking species invasions with digital biodiversity data

Large online data sources are increasingly important to understand biological invasions. Emerging fields of conservation culturomics and iEcology have a great potential to inform invasion science and practice through novel ...

Indigenous lands: A haven for wildlife

Indigenous peoples' lands may harbor a significant proportion of threatened and endangered species globally, according to University of Queensland-led research.

Protected areas help waterbirds adapt to climate change

Climate change pushes species distribution areas northward. However, the expansion of species ranges is not self-evident due to e.g. habitat degradation and unsustainable harvesting caused by human activities. A new study ...

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