Biology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal. It was split off as a separate journal from the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences in 2005 after having been published as a supplement. Originally it was published quarterly, but from 2007 it has been published bimonthly. The journal publishes short articles from across biology. The editor-in-chief is Brian Charlesworth. As of 2010, Biology Letters has an impact factor of 3.651 and is ranked 14th in Biology. All content is assigned to one of the following categories: Animal behaviour, Biomechanics, Community ecology, Conservation, Evolutionary biology, Evolutionary developmental biology, Genome biology, Global Change Biology, Marine biology, Molecular evolution, Neurobiology, Palaeontology, Pathogen Biology, Physiology, Phylogeny, Population ecology, or Population genetics. The journal publishes research articles, opinion pieces, scientific meeting reports, comments, and invited reply articles.

Publisher
Royal Society Publishing
Country
United Kingdom
History
2005-present
Website
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
3.651 (2010)

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How do we protect our unique biodiversity from megafires?

This summer's devastating Australian fires and their continuing impact on biodiversity serve as a stark reminder of the challenges in nature conservation as we head into an increasingly volatile future driven by climate change.

North Island robins found to have long term memory

A pair of researchers at Victoria University of Wellington has found that North Island robins have long-term memory. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Rachael Shaw and Annette Harvey describe experiments ...

Giant extinct ancient rodent had a tiny brain

A team of researchers with Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Universidade Federal do Acre and the Paleontological Institute and Museum has discovered the ancient remains of a giant, extinct, tiny-brained rodent that once ...

Origin of ambergris verified through DNA analyses

A team of researchers from Denmark, the U.K. and Ireland has identified the origin of ambergris. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes analyzing DNA sequences from ambergris samples ...

Penguin calls found to conform to human linguistic laws

A team of researchers from France and Italy has found that African penguin calls conform to linguistic laws used by humans. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of penguin ...

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