Biology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal. It was split off as a separate journal from the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences in 2005 after having been published as a supplement. Originally it was published quarterly, but from 2007 it has been published bimonthly. The journal publishes short articles from across biology. The editor-in-chief is Brian Charlesworth. As of 2010, Biology Letters has an impact factor of 3.651 and is ranked 14th in Biology. All content is assigned to one of the following categories: Animal behaviour, Biomechanics, Community ecology, Conservation, Evolutionary biology, Evolutionary developmental biology, Genome biology, Global Change Biology, Marine biology, Molecular evolution, Neurobiology, Palaeontology, Pathogen Biology, Physiology, Phylogeny, Population ecology, or Population genetics. The journal publishes research articles, opinion pieces, scientific meeting reports, comments, and invited reply articles.

Publisher
Royal Society Publishing
Country
United Kingdom
History
2005-present
Website
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
3.651 (2010)

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Crows caught on camera fashioning special hook tools

Dr Jolyon Troscianko, from the University of Exeter, and Dr Christian Rutz, from the University of St Andrews, have captured first video recordings documenting how these tropical corvids fashion these particularly complex ...

Unusual anal fin offers new insight into evolution

(Phys.org) —An unusual fossil fish that has fins behind its anus could have implications for human evolution according to a scientist at The University of Manchester.

Could goats become man's best friend?

Goats have the capacity to communicate with people like other domesticated animals, such as dogs and horses, according to scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Ancient whales were predators not gentle giants

Ancient whales had extremely sharp predator teeth similar to lions, Australian scientists said Wednesday in a discovery they believe debunks theories the mammals used their teeth to filter feed like today's gentle giants.

Why birds don't have teeth

Why did birds lose their teeth? Was it so they would be lighter in the air? Or are pointy beaks better for worm-eating than the jagged jaws of dinosaur ancestors?

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