Biology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal. It was split off as a separate journal from the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences in 2005 after having been published as a supplement. Originally it was published quarterly, but from 2007 it has been published bimonthly. The journal publishes short articles from across biology. The editor-in-chief is Brian Charlesworth. As of 2010, Biology Letters has an impact factor of 3.651 and is ranked 14th in Biology. All content is assigned to one of the following categories: Animal behaviour, Biomechanics, Community ecology, Conservation, Evolutionary biology, Evolutionary developmental biology, Genome biology, Global Change Biology, Marine biology, Molecular evolution, Neurobiology, Palaeontology, Pathogen Biology, Physiology, Phylogeny, Population ecology, or Population genetics. The journal publishes research articles, opinion pieces, scientific meeting reports, comments, and invited reply articles.

Publisher
Royal Society Publishing
Country
United Kingdom
History
2005-present
Website
http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
3.651 (2010)

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Which came first, the lizard or the egg?

In a world first, researchers at the University of Sydney have observed a normally live-bearing Australian lizard lay three eggs and then weeks later, give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy. This is the first time ...

How birds and insects reacted to the solar eclipse

A team of researchers with Cornell University and the University of Oxford has found that birds and insects reacted in some surprising ways to the 2017 U.S. total solar eclipse. In their paper published in the journal Biology ...

Uncovering the role of the ilio-sacral joint in frogs

A trio of researchers, two with the Royal Veterinary College, the other the University of Portsmouth, has found evidence that suggests that the ilio-sacral joint in frogs evolved after they started jumping. In their paper ...

How does a one-tonne dino hatch its eggs? Carefully

Most dinosaurs buried their eggs and hoped for the best, but some species—including a few hefty ones—built nests and pampered unhatched offspring much as birds do today, researchers reported Wednesday.

Testing the advantage of being left-handed in sports

(Phys.org)—Sports scientist Florian Loffing with the Institute of Sport Science, University of Oldenburg in Germany has conducted a study regarding the possibility of left-handed athletes having an advantage over their ...

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