How slippery surfaces allow sticky pastes and gels to slide

An MIT research team that has already conquered the problem of getting ketchup out of its bottle has now tackled a new category of consumer and manufacturing woe: how to get much thicker materials to slide without sticking ...

The sticky science of underwater adhesives

Mussels stick to rocks on the seafloor, to aquatic plants, and—to the consternation of boaters—they can hitch rides fastened to seafaring vessels no matter their composition: metals, rubber, glass, wood and more.

Tuneable reverse photochromes in the solid state

Photochromes are dyes that change their colour depending on the light they receive. When light is switched off they can either remain in their photoinduced state (P-type photochromes) or turn back to their original state ...

'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3-D space

In the blockbuster Terminator movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its "liquid-metal" composition. Although current robots don't have these ...

Turning stem cells into bone with nanoclay-reinforced hydrogel

Assistant Professor Alireza Dolatshahi-Pirouz and colleagues have developed a hydrogel that combines synthetic materials with living cells, and can turn stem cells into bone without adding external growth or differentiation ...

'Unclonable' tag combats counterfeiters

Discovering that your new designer handbag or gold watch is a fake is costly and annoying, and counterfeit medical devices or drugs could have even more serious consequences. But seemingly as soon as manufacturers develop ...

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