Nano-infused ceramic could report on its own health

A ceramic that becomes more electrically conductive under elastic strain and less conductive under plastic strain could lead to a new generation of sensors embedded into structures like buildings, bridges and aircraft able ...

Waterproof graphene electronic circuits

Water molecules distort the electrical resistance of graphene, but a team of European researchers has discovered that when this two-dimensional material is integrated with the metal of a circuit, contact resistance is not ...

A newly discovered catalyst promises cheaper hydrogen production

A new catalyst could dramatically decrease the cost of producing hydrogen, one of the cleanest renewable fuels. Based on molybdenum sulfide, the catalyst was developed by a group at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research ...

Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the ...

Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases

The wonders of graphene are numerous—it can enable flexible electronic components, enhance solar cell capacity, filter the finest subatomic particles and revolutionize batteries. Now, the "supermaterial" may one day be ...

Researchers discover new material—black silver

Researchers from the Singapore University of Design and Technology (SUTD) have engineered a new, inexpensive nanomaterial that has applications ranging from biomolecule detectors to solar energy conversion. The key to the ...

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists ...

A hydrogel that adheres firmly to cartilage and meniscus

EPFL researchers have developed a hydrogel – made up of nearly 90% water – that naturally adheres to soft tissue like cartilage and the meniscus. If the hydrogel carries repair cells, it could help damaged tissue to heal.

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