News tagged with pest

Seeing more than carbon for the trees

'Best practice' carbon farming that considers more than just the carbon in trees is needed if the full benefits of trees in the landscape are to be realised by farmers, landholders, and the community.

Sep 24, 2013
5 / 5 (4) 0

Race to save the devil Down Under

It's been hundreds of years since the Tasmanian devil last lived on the Australian mainland but, in the misty hills of Barrington Tops, a pioneering group is being bred for survival.

May 17, 2012
4.5 / 5 (4) 0

Trouble on the horizon for GM crops?

(Phys.org) -- Pests are adapting to genetically modified crops in unexpected ways, researchers have discovered. The findings underscore the importance of closely monitoring and countering pest resistance to ...

Jun 20, 2012
4 / 5 (4) 1 | with audio podcast

Ladybirds thrive on organic aphids

Ladybird larvae that eat prey raised on organically-grown crops are more likely to survive than those eating aphids raised on crops grown with conventional fertiliser, a new experiment shows.

Jul 06, 2012
5 / 5 (3) 3 | with audio podcast

Bees survival: Ban more pesticides?

Neonicotinoids are under intense scrutiny. But a ban of a broad variety of pesticides may be required to protect bees, humans and the environment.

May 03, 2013
5 / 5 (3) 1

Insects: A must for a protein-rich diet

Arnold van Huis is an expert on tropical insects specialised in pest management and biological control based at Wageningen University. He advocates growing insects as feed for livestock and for human consumption. Here, van ...

May 14, 2013
5 / 5 (3) 1

Chinese wasps are taking on the emerald ash borer

The emerald ash borer (EAB), a relatively new invasive insect pest, has killed tens of millions of ash trees throughout the eastern United States since it was first detected in 2002 in Michigan and Canada. ...

Jun 05, 2013
3.8 / 5 (4) 0

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Aug 27, 2014
5 / 5 (3) 0