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Condensed Matter news

How oversized atoms could help shrink

"Lab-on-a-chip" devices – which can carry out several laboratory functions on a single, micro-sized chip – are the result of a quiet scientific revolution over the past few years. For example, they enable doctors to make ...

dateJul 01, 2015 in Condensed Matter
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Towards the ultimate model of water

Researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), IBM and the University of Edinburgh have developed the first conceptually simple but broadly applicable model for water.

Uncovering the secrets of super solar power perovskites

The best hope for cheap, super-efficient solar power is a remarkable family of crystalline materials called hybrid perovskites. In just five years of development, hybrid perovskite solar cells have attained power conversion ...

New transitory form of silica observed

A Carnegie-led team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Communications.

New material set to change cooling industry

Refrigeration and air conditioning may become more efficient and environmentally friendly thanks to the patent-pending work of LSU physicists. The team of researchers led by LSU Physics Professor Shane Stadler has discovered ...

Squeezing out new science from material interfaces

With more than five times the thermal conductivity of copper, diamond is the ultimate heat spreader. But the slow rate of heat flow into diamond from other materials limits its use in practice. In particular, the physical ...

Quantum model helps solve mysteries of water

Water is one of the most common and extensively studied substances on earth. It is vital for all known forms of life but its unique behaviour has yet to be explained in terms of the properties of individual molecules.

From metal to insulator and back again

New work from Carnegie's Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.

Electron spin brings order to high entropy alloys
Pseudoparticles travel through photoactive material
Why seashells' mineral forms differently in seawater
New process allows for stronger, lighter, flexible steel
Study reveals missing boundary in PZT phase diagram
New breakthrough in thermoelectric materials
Mixing up a batch of stronger metals
World's most complex crystal simulated
Researchers discover new material to produce clean energy
The building blocks of the future defy logic
How iron feels the heat

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