Kiel University

The University of Kiel (German Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, CAU) is a university in the city of Kiel, Germany. It was founded in 1665 as the Academia Holsatorum Chiloniensis by Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp and has approximately 23,000 students today. The University of Kiel is the largest, oldest, and most prestigious in the state of Schleswig-Holstein. The University of Kiel was founded under the name Christiana Albertina on 5 October 1665 by Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp. The citizens of the city of Kiel were initially quite sceptical about the upcoming influx of students, thinking that these could be "quite a pest with their gluttony, heavy drinking and their questionable character" (German: mit Fressen, Sauffen und allerley leichtfertigem Wesen sehr ärgerlich seyn). But those in the city who envisioned economic advantages of a university in the city won, and Kiel thus became the northernmost university in the Holy Roman Empire.

Address
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany, Germany
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Mysterious gene functionally decoded

The protein BEM46 is found in all creatures having a nucleus. Mammals have several copies of this gene whereas fungus have only one copy. Some years ago the bem46 gene was named under the top ten of the "known-unknown genes". ...

Jun 23, 2014 5 / 5 (2) 0

Molecules do the triple twist

They are three-dimensional and yet single-sided: Moebius strips. These twisted objects have only one side and one edge and they put our imagination to the test. Under the leadership of Kiel University's chemist ...

May 27, 2014 5 / 5 (4) 0

Tracking marine food sources

Oceans cover nearly 75 percent of the earth's surface and have always been an important source of food and resources. Yet overfishing, pollution and mismanagement threaten marine ecosystems and thus one of ...

Dec 04, 2013 not rated yet 0

Adhesion at 180,000 frames per second

Adhesion is an extremely important factor in living nature: insects can climb up walls, plants can twine up them, and cells are able to adhere to surfaces. During evolution, many of them developed mushroom-shaped ...

Oct 14, 2013 4.9 / 5 (17) 0 | with audio podcast