Ancient Buddhist murals found in Nepal

May 05, 2007

Murals depicting the life of Buddha and painted 800 years ago have been discovered in a cave in a remote area of Nepal, a report said.

A team of archaeologists and mountain climbers spent three weeks searching for the cave, The Times of London reported Saturday. They learned of the paintings from a shepherd who found them when he took shelter in the cave a few years ago.

The cave is in Lo Manthang, capital of Mustang, a semi-autonomous kingdom on the border between Nepal and Tibet. Mustang placed itself under the protection of Nepal in 1950 to avoid a Chinese takeover when Tibet was annexed.

The team, including two Nepalese archaeologists and an Italian art expert who helped restore the Sistine Chapel, have not revealed the exact location of the cave. In addition to the murals, they found manuscripts, pottery and gold and silver items.

The archaeologists say that the cave may have been used for burials.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Net neutrality balancing act

40 minutes ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Recommended for you

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Apr 19, 2014

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

Apr 17, 2014

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

Apr 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Finnish inventor rethinks design of the axe

(Phys.org) —Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä is the man behind the Vipukirves Leveraxe, which is a precision tool for splitting firewood. He designed the tool to make the job easier and more efficient, with ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.