Stone Age site found in Sweden

Apr 27, 2007

Residents in a new development in the Swedish port of Gothenburg will be living on top of one of the earliest archaeological sites in the country.

The area in the Kalleback neighborhood is about 3 miles from the coast, The Local reported. But 10,000 years ago, it was a peninsula where ancient hunters took advantage of the available resources.

"They most probably fished, and would certainly have hunted for seal," archaeologist Ulf Ragnesten said. "This was right at the end of a headland, and this means that there was access to animals for hunting."

Ragnesten said archaeologists have known for about 20 years that there were ancient remains in the area. When the land was slated for development, they had to dig.

The Stone Age finds lie under more recent Iron Age remains from 640 B.C.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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