Lexmark Launches Education Printing Platform

Apr 25, 2007

Lexmark's Education Station provides a variety of document management features as well as print, copy, scan and fax capabilities.

Lexmark International announced April 24 that it has made available its Education Station, a laser multifunction product aimed at education professionals that provides print, copy, scan and fax functions.

Using the eTask touch-screen interface, the Education Station features the ability to personalize destinations on the network, and scan-to-classroom and forms-on-demand capabilities, allowing teachers to manage their own documents and send evidence of work documents, which teachers can use for parent/teacher conferences.

With the eTask touch-screen interface, school office personnel can also scan and e-mail tardy slips, doctors' notes and discipline forms directly to teachers, while the forms-on-demand application allows teachers and administrators to access and print files stored on the network directly from the Education Station.

"The Lexmark Education Station builds on our heritage of providing unique solutions that help teachers spend less time on paperwork and more time with students and makes it even easier and more affordable for schools to implement these solutions in their classroom," Paul Rooke, executive vice president and president of the Printing Solutions and Services Division of Lexmark, based in Lexington, Ky., said in a statement.

The MFP also features optional testing and grading software that enables teachers to assemble student test results and analyze the progress of each individual student. With this optional software, teachers are able to print 15-, 30- and 60-question tests using the provided bubble sheet templates.

The Education Station is able to print an image of the student's test along with an answer key that shows which answers were incorrect, the student's grade, and a space where the teacher can provide comments, allowing students to view their progress.

The education platform also allows teachers to meet the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act by enabling them see which students are falling behind and identify weak points in their curriculum content, the company said.

Lexmark's Education Station is available immediately for $3,699.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

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