Climate change may be lemmings' cliff

Apr 21, 2007

Canadian researchers say lemmings may be in danger of falling off the climate change "cliff."

The Wildlife Conservation Society says climate change could deprive the rodents of the snow they need for homes and lock up their food in ice.

"We need to know how climate change will affect a variety of resident and migratory predators that rely in large part on these small arctic rodents," WCS Canada researcher Don Reid said Friday in a release.

"The ability of lemmings to adapt to these changes will have a significant impact on the entire food web, so we need to understand more about lemming ecology within the context of climate change," he said.

Lemmings are an important prey species for a number of predators, from hawks to grizzly bears.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: US proposes stricter ozone limits

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Calcium loss turning lakes to 'jelly'

Nov 18, 2014

New research on a number of Canadian lakes show that historical acid deposits as a result of industry have greatly reduced calcium levels in the water - dramatically impacting populations of calcium-rich ...

Invasive species threaten global biodiversity

Nov 06, 2014

Until a few decades ago, there were no beavers in Patagonia. That changed when 20 pairs of the tree-chewing creature were introduced with the hopes of creating a fur industry.

Four Kansas laboratories work on ending famine

Nov 13, 2014

Can a wasp feed the world? It can help. If its larvae are nurtured near millet fields where a devastating moth steals harvests from the field, they can grow to become predators that destroy the pests and save a crop. And ...

Recommended for you

US proposes stricter ozone limits

3 hours ago

The US Environmental Protection Agency announced plans Wednesday to strengthen emission regulations for ozone, a smog-causing pollutant blamed for respiratory ailments affecting millions of Americans.

Deforestation drops 18 percent in Brazil's Amazon

6 hours ago

Deforestation in the Amazon rain forest dropped 18 percent over the past 12 months, falling to the second-lowest level in a quarter century, Brazil's environment minister said Wednesday.

The unbelievable underworld and its impact on us all

8 hours ago

A new study has pulled together research into the most diverse place on earth to demonstrate how the organisms below-ground could hold the key to understanding how the worlds ecosystems function and how they ...

Toolkit for ocean health

10 hours ago

The ocean is undergoing global changes at a remarkable pace and we must change with it to attain our best possible future ocean, warns the head of The University of Western Australia's Oceans Institute.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.