Climate change to hit poorest hardest

Apr 06, 2007

Climate change will hit the world's poorest people the hardest, international experts meeting in Brussels said Friday.

The experts on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change worked through the night fine-tuning a major report that claims climate change it is already having an impact on the natural world, the BBC reported.

As the summary language was finalized, several delegations, including those from the United States, Saudi Arabia, China and Spain, asked that the final version reflect less certainty than the draft did, the BBC reported.

"(The report) says quite clearly that climate change is happening and it is having effects on ecosystems and society, with particularly bad effects on developing countries," said Richard Klein of the Stockholm Environment Institute.

"So it is quite a bleak message but it's now up to governments to act on what we told them."

The panel of hundreds of scientists will send the report to world leaders.

The first IPCC report found that it's likely human activity is responsible for climate change. The next report, due in May, will look at ways to reduce global warming.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Underwater elephants

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Designing exascale computers

Jul 23, 2014

"Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient's arteries, showing how millions ...

Agricultural trade appears unaffected by BC carbon tax

Jul 23, 2014

British Columbia's carbon tax does not appear to have had a measurable impact on international agricultural trade, despite concerns it would greatly reduce the BC industry's competitiveness, according to new analysis commissioned ...

Recommended for you

Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

7 hours ago

In a paper published online today in the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature, Northeastern researchers Evan Kodra and Auroop Ganguly found that while global temperature is indeed increasing, so too is the variab ...

Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon

7 hours ago

Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of PerĂº. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change ...

How might climate change affect our food supply?

8 hours ago

It's no easy question to answer, but prudence demands that we try. Thus, Microsoft and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have teamed up to tackle "food resilience," one of several themes ...

Groundwater is safe in potential N.Y. fracking area

8 hours ago

Two Cornell hydrologists have completed a thorough groundwater examination of drinking water in a potential hydraulic fracturing area in New York's Southern Tier. They determined that drinking water in potable ...

User comments : 0