NASA Completes Key Review of Orion Spacecraft

Mar 07, 2007
Orion
Orion in lunar orbit. Image credit: Lockheed Martin Corp.

NASA has established a requirements baseline for the Orion crew exploration vehicle, bringing America's next human spacecraft a step closer to construction.

The Orion Project completed its system requirements review in cooperation with its prime contractor, Lockheed Martin, March 1. The review marked the first major milestone in the Orion engineering process and provided the foundation for design, development, construction and safe operation of the spacecraft that will carry explorers to Earth orbit, to the moon, and eventually to Mars. The detailed requirements established in this review will serve as the basis for ongoing design analysis work and systems testing.

"This is a significant step in the development of a space transportation system that will expand our horizons to include other worlds," said Skip Hatfield, Orion Project manager at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The Orion review followed an overall review of requirements for the Constellation Program that was completed in November. Similar reviews are planned later this spring for ground and mission operations systems that will support Constellation launch systems and space flight operations ground infrastructure.

"We have now completed program-wide launch vehicle and human spacecraft system requirements reviews," said Constellation Program Manager Jeff Hanley. "These are important pieces of a management and engineering puzzle that will allow us to accomplish the goal of putting humans back on the moon."

The Orion requirements data set was reviewed by agency and contractor scientists and engineers from across the country. More than 1,700 topics covering all aspects of vehicle performance, design and qualification were discussed during the course of the formal review.

Once all project-level reviews are complete, the Constellation Program will hold another full review to update baseline requirements. A lunar architecture systems review of equipment associated with surface exploration and science activities on the moon is expected in the spring of 2009.

Credit: NASA

Explore further: Launch pad where rocket exploded back next year

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Internet trend puts users center stage

36 minutes ago

Sensors that track steps, pulse, diet and more marked a wearable computing fashion trend this year as they evolve from measuring what we've done to telling us what to do.

3-D printer in high demand at NSLS-II

26 minutes ago

It looks like a coffee dispenser. But the nondescript grey box tucked against a wall in Bldg. 743 is actually a 3D printer. It's in high demand by scientists and engineers building beamlines for the National ...

Dingoes bring economic benefit to cattle graziers

16 minutes ago

Stopping dingo control measures such as baiting and fencing could increase net profit for cattle grazing enterprises – that's the surprising result from new University of Adelaide research.

BitTorrent embarks on web browser Project Maelstrom

50 minutes ago

On a mission to make the Internet more open, a BitTorrent browser, "Project Maelstrom," is in invite-only alpha. The BitTorrent blog on Wednesday posted "an invite-only Alpha to help build the distributed ...

Recommended for you

Image: Sunset over the Gulf of Mexico

14 hours ago

From the International Space Station, Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry W. Virts took this photograph of the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Gulf Coast at sunset and posted it to social media on Dec. 14, 2014.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.