Inexpensive fun fuels text messaging growth

Jan 31, 2007

Fun technology coupled with economical pricing fuel young adults' burgeoning use of text messaging, according to new research conducted by the DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University.

Worldwide users send over 1 trillion text messages each year. Forecasts call for continued growth of wireless communications especially in North America. The research shows young adults (19-25) find text messaging's instant social interaction fun, at a perceived economical cost.

The results of the study are published in this month's journal Information & Management.

"As the market continues to develop, telecommunication companies would be smart to focus on the fun of using text messaging and the low price of the medium as they build their marketing growth plans," says Nick Bontis, associate professor of strategic management at the DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University.

The researchers report that almost half of young adults surveyed had used text messaging. They send an average of 50 messages per month and spend approximately $46 US per month on mobile phone services.

Source: McMaster University

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