A New Year for BaBar and PEP-II

Jan 19, 2007
A New Year for BaBar and PEP-II
Upgrades on the BaBar detector and PEP-II accelerator continued into the first week of 2007. Collaborators turned them on again this week after a four-month shutdown.

With electrons and positrons flowing, BaBar and PEP-II are celebrating a new year with a new run.

With its upgrade complete, the BaBar detector began collecting cosmic rays on Jan. 6 while waiting for beam to arrive. The newly improved PEP-II accelerator began storing beams on Jan. 15. Collisions that produce physics data will start soon.

"All the technicians, physicists and maintenance crews did a superb job installing many important upgrades in PEP-II during the last four months. We now have the pieces in place to deliver the next level of luminosity to BaBar," said John Seeman, head of the Accelerator Systems Division.

The BaBar collaboration did extensive work during the down time, especially installing a better muon identification system, to take full advantage of the enhanced luminosity, or number of events the detector will see.

"We're looking forward to superb physics performance in Run 6, thanks to the upgraded muon identification system and to the higher luminosity expected from PEP-II," said BaBar Technical Coordinator Bill Wisniewski.

Over the next two years, BaBar expects to more than double its already vast data set, giving physicists a fantastic shot at tracking down extremely rare processes and finding signs of new behavior in the way nature works at the most fundamental level.

"It's an exciting new year for us. We're really pushing the limits of physics and the limits of the accelerator and detector. This is only possible because of the significant improvements made by hundreds of extremely hard-working, talented people," said BaBar Spokesperson Hassan Jawahery.

"It's great to see PEP-II and BaBar back online again," said Director of Particle and Particle Astrophysics Persis Drell.

Source: by Heather Rock Woods, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

Explore further: Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

2 hours ago

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

US urged to drop India WTO case on solar

3 hours ago

Environmentalists Wednesday urged the United States to drop plans to haul India to the WTO to open its solar market, saying the action would hurt the fight against climate change.

Recommended for you

Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors

3 hours ago

When monitoring nuclear reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has to rely on input given by the operators. In the future, antineutrino detectors may provide an additional option for monitoring. ...

Imaging turns a corner

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Scientists have developed a new microscope which enables a dramatically improved view of biological cells.

Mapping the road to quantum gravity

21 hours ago

The road uniting quantum field theory and general relativity – the two great theories of modern physics – has been impassable for 80 years. Could a tool from condensed matter physics finally help map ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

A 'quantum leap' in encryption technology

Toshiba Research Europe, BT, ADVA Optical Networking and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the UK's National Measurement Institute, today announced the first successful trial of Quantum Key Distribution ...

Phase transiting to a new quantum universe

(Phys.org) —Recent insight and discovery of a new class of quantum transition opens the way for a whole new subfield of materials physics and quantum technologies.

Bake your own droplet lens

A droplet of clear liquid can bend light, acting as a lens. Now, by exploiting this well-known phenomenon, researchers have developed a new process to create inexpensive high quality lenses that will cost ...

When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

Colorful church windows, beads on a necklace and many of our favorite plastics share something in common—they all belong to a state of matter known as glasses. School children learn the difference between ...