When sea monsters threaten, eat them

Dec 07, 2005

Japanese fishermen report encountering an increasing number of "sea monsters" -- 6-foot-wide, 450-pound poisonous jellyfish.

Called echizen kurage, the jellyfish might well have been invented by a Japanese science fiction writer, but they are actually beginning to interfere with Japan's food supply, The Times of London reported Wednesday.

Echizen kurage, or Nomura's jellyfish as they are called in English, have long been a bother to fishermen in the Sea of Japan. But the number of jellyfish is rapidly increasing -- 100 times higher than normal in some areas -- and they are also being reported on the Pacific side of the nation.

The giant jellyfish clog fishing nets and, because of their weight, often break the nets or crush fish, the Times said. Some fishermen report an 80-percent decline in income.

Although the fish are more prized as food in China, Japanese consumers are beginning to eat them as a novelty food, sold dried and salted. Students in Obama have turned them into tofu, and jellyfish collagen is promoted as being beneficial to skin.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physicists discuss quantum pigeonhole principle

1 hour ago

The pigeonhole principle: "If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole." So where's the argument? Physicists say there is an important argument. While the ...

Giant crater in Russia's far north sparks mystery

3 hours ago

A vast crater discovered in a remote region of Siberia known to locals as "the end of the world" is causing a sensation in Russia, with a group of scientists being sent to investigate.

NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

3 hours ago

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

Giant anteaters kill two hunters in Brazil

3 hours ago

Giant anteaters in Brazil have killed two hunters in separate incidents, raising concerns about the animals' loss of habitat and the growing risk of dangerous encounters with people, researchers said.

Recommended for you

Soccer's key role in helping migrants to adjust

19 hours ago

New research from the University of Adelaide has for the first time detailed the important role the sport of soccer has played in helping migrants to adjust to their new lives in Australia.

How dinosaurs shrank, survived and evolved into birds

21 hours ago

That starling at your birdfeeder? It is a dinosaur. The chicken on your dinner plate? Also a dinosaur. That mangy seagull scavenging for chips on the beach? Apart from being disgusting, yet again it is a ...

User comments : 0