Archeological dig Web site diary offered

Jan 17, 2007

U.S. Egyptologist Betsy Bryan is sharing her work with the world through an online diary, detailing the day-to-day life at an archaeological dig.

Starting Friday and through late February, visitors to "Hopkins in Egypt Today" (
www.jhu.edu/neareast/egypttoday.html) will find photos of Bryan and her colleagues working on Johns Hopkins University's 12th annual excavation at the Mut Temple Precinct in Luxor, Egypt.

The exploration centers on the Egyptian New Kingdom (1567 to 1085 B.C.), known as the "golden age" of Egyptian temple building.

This is the seventh year Bryan and her team will be excavating the area behind the temple's sacred lake, where in previous years their finds have included industrial and food processing installations such as granaries and bakeries.

Bryan said the goal of the "Hopkins in Egypt Today" Web site is to educate visitors by showing them elements of archaeological work in progress.

The Web site usually records more than 50,000 hits every winter when the dig is active. The site will resume in June when Bryan will be working with a larger team, including students from Johns Hopkins and several stone conservators.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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