Draper prize to go to MIT researcher

Jan 15, 2007

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher credited with inventing the World Wide Web is the winner of the 2007 Charles Stark Draper Prize.

Timothy Berners-Lee will receive the $500,000 award and gold medallion that is considered engineering's Nobel Prize during Feb. 20 ceremonies in Washington.

Berners-Lee "imaginatively combined ideas to create the World Wide Web, an extraordinary innovation that is rapidly transforming the way people store, access, and share information around the globe," according to the National Academy of Engineers, which established the Draper Prize in 1988 to honor engineers whose accomplishments have significantly benefited society.

Berners-Lee proposed his concept for the Web in 1989 while at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. He launched it on the Internet in 1991 and continued to refine its design through 1993.

He is now a senior researcher at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

The Draper Prize, which honors the memory of "Doc" Draper, the "father of inertial navigation," is designed to increase public understanding of the contributions of engineering and technology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Pharmaceuticals and the water-fish-osprey food web

7 hours ago

Ospreys do not carry significant amounts of human pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread occurrence of these chemicals in water, a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Baylor University study finds. ...

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

3 hours ago

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

6 hours ago

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

7 hours ago

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

User comments : 0