Science funds come up short for 2007

Jan 08, 2007

After Congress failed to pass new budgets for the current fiscal year, scientific institutions across the United States could suffer setbacks.

The New York Times reported the financial crisis could close several major facilities, delay new projects and force thousands out of work.

Scientists say the areas most affected will likely be physics, chemistry and astronomy. Biology, on the other hand, seems to fare far better, with more than $28 billion annually going towards biomedical programs, the Times reported.

Facilities affected by the budget freeze include Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California.

"The consequences for American science will be disastrous," said Michael S. Lubell, a senior official of the American Physical Society, the world's largest group of physicists. "The message to young scientists and industry leaders, alike, will be, 'Look outside the U.S. if you want to succeed.'"

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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