Relics of Taipei's first settlement found

Jan 06, 2007

The ruins of Taiwan's earliest settlement in Taipei, dating around 2,500 years before Christ, have been found in a vacant lot, an archaeologist said.

A pottery shard and stone tools were discovered about 11 feet below the surface of the lot where an elementary school and police precinct station once stood, the China Post said Friday.

Liu Yi-chang, an Academia Sinica archaeologist, said the remains belonged to the earliest humans who settled in the Taipei basin about 4,500 years ago. No human remains were found.

"The pottery shard we found seems to have been part of a pot for cooking," Liu said.

Liu said the relics were part of the Hsintangpu culture.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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