Relics of Taipei's first settlement found

Jan 06, 2007

The ruins of Taiwan's earliest settlement in Taipei, dating around 2,500 years before Christ, have been found in a vacant lot, an archaeologist said.

A pottery shard and stone tools were discovered about 11 feet below the surface of the lot where an elementary school and police precinct station once stood, the China Post said Friday.

Liu Yi-chang, an Academia Sinica archaeologist, said the remains belonged to the earliest humans who settled in the Taipei basin about 4,500 years ago. No human remains were found.

"The pottery shard we found seems to have been part of a pot for cooking," Liu said.

Liu said the relics were part of the Hsintangpu culture.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Dinosaur no more: UK museum's Dippy to be retired in 2017

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Standalone wireless info display device an easy fit

1 hour ago

A Latvian team has come up with a good-looking WiFi display device, connecting to the Internet using WiFi, which runs on a high-capacity built-in battery and tracks what's important to you. This is a standalone ...

Technology improves avalanche gear for backcountry skiers

3 hours ago

As outdoor recreation companies increasingly cater to skiers and snowboarders who like to venture beyond the groomed slopes at ski resorts and tackle backcountry terrain, they've put a special emphasis on gear and equipment ...

The elephant poaching business in numbers

3 hours ago

From the pittance paid to local poachers to a multi-billion dollar industry, here are some of the key numbers related to Africa's endangered elephants:

UN moves toward major treaty for ocean biodiversity

3 hours ago

UN member states agreed Saturday to begin negotiations on a treaty to protect marine biodiversity in ocean areas extending beyond territorial waters, in a move heralded by environmental organizations.

Recommended for you

Long-necked 'dragon' discovered in China

Jan 28, 2015

University of Alberta paleontologists including PhD student Tetsuto Miyashita, former MSc student Lida Xing and professor Philip Currie have discovered a new species of a long-necked dinosaur from a skeleton ...

The largest known muntiacine found in China

Jan 28, 2015

Dr. HOU Sukuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a new species of muntiacine Euprox in the journal of Zootaxa 3911 (1) recent ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.