Mastodon tooth find thrills Mich. family

Jan 06, 2007

The way a Michigan man found three mastodon teeth may not be as adventurous as an Indiana Jones movie, but the discovery was just as exciting.

Billy and Jeanette Sizemore found the three mastodon molars -- each measuring about 7 inches long and 3 1/2 inches thick -- while clearing rocks from a path on their property near Montrose, Mich., the Flint (Mich.) Journal said.

"It's exciting. It's like we're a part of history, like we've discovered something the whole family can be proud of," said Troy Sizemore, Billy's father, whose property adjoins his son's.

Sheila Swyrtek, a geology professor, confirmed the teeth were three permanent lower molars of a mastodon, an extinct hairy elephant-like mammal that once roamed lower Michigan.

The family is discussing with local colleges the possibility of the property becoming an archeological dig site which will be like going to Disney World" for his grandchildren, Sizemore said.

"They're having dreams of finding dinosaurs in their yard."

Swyrtek said about 250 mastodons, ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 years old, have been found in Michigan.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Apr 19, 2014

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

Apr 17, 2014

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

Apr 17, 2014

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth

(Phys.org) —It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So there were skeptics in 2001 when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal ...