Nintendo Revolution has parental controls

Dec 01, 2005
Nintendo unveiled 'Revolution' - one-handed wireless game controller

Following video-game industry expectations, Japanese console maker Nintendo has announced that it will be including parental-control features in its upcoming Nintendo Revolution video-game console.

The feature will work in conjunction with the rating levels assigned by the Entertainment Software Rating Board. Parents will be able to choose a password for the system, then designate which games their children will be able to access without the password. The six ratings are as follows: EC (early childhood); E (everyone); E10(plus) (everyone 10 years of age and older); T (teen); M (mature) and A (adult).

"This is based on the ratings of the games," said Beth Llewelyn, senior director of corporate communications for Nintendo of America, who explained that the ESRB ratings themselves would be encoded into the game software that the hardware will recognize and use.

"There's a wide variety of games," said Llewelyn. "A rating system lets parents know what is and isn't appropriate."

With video games cutting across a wide variety of demographics, what was once considered a mainstay of youth entertainment is now geared towards both children's and adult markets. According to a recently released study, the average age of a video-game player, or "gamer," is now 30.

"Parents should play very active roles in monitoring what their kids play and making decisions as to what's appropriate to their children," said Patricia Vance, president of the ESRB. "We provide a rating system so that parents have a tool available to them for virtually every game sold in the U.S. and Canada.

"If the parents have the ability to control the system itself by setting these parental controls, that benefits everyone," said Vance.

Parental-control elements are nothing new to the video-game industry, which has faced criticism in the past about content within video-game titles. A report released Tuesday from the National Institute on Media and the Family included a list of the "12 games to avoid" this holiday season. Titles such as "Doom 3" and "Resident Evil 4" were cited for violent content while "Blitz: The League" was criticized for including scenes in which football players hired prostitutes and engaged in drug deals. Undead-themed games such as "F.E.A.R." and "Stubbs the Zombie in Rebel Without a Pulse" drew attention for scenes of graphic cannibalism.

Lockout features for PC and console games have long allowed users to block or alter violent content. Easily accessed options might remove a controversial scene or change the color of a spurt of blood within a video game from a grittily realistic red to a blue or green.

Sony's Playstation 2 game console raised eyebrows upon its initial release for restricting DVDs that could be played by the unit. While entering a code could rescind the limitation, it was one of the first efforts of this kind on a game console. Parental-control options have been included with the recently released Xbox 360 and have been planned for Sony's upcoming Playstation 3 console.

"Most consoles already have parental controls built in," said Ben Bajarin, an analyst for Creative Strategies. "This is expected from Nintendo, given its historically younger target market, which is a good step and allows parents to be even more intrigued with a console their kids demanded.

"Password protection is the most logical and there were other ways to do this, but making it as easy as possible is key to them. The rating system for video games has gotten pretty good and they can even set it to control what DVDs are watched," said Bajarin.

When asked if children would be able to guess the password, Bajarin said this was possible but probably wouldn't be a concern with younger users. Still, parents might have to take the time to think of a more personal password than one that might be obvious within a family.

The Nintendo Revolution game console is due for release sometime in 2006.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Sony's PlayStation back online after Christmas hack

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

French watchdog urges no 3D for under sixes

Nov 05, 2014

A French health watchdog recommended Thursday that children under six be denied access to 3D films, computers and video games, and that those up to 13 have "moderate" access.

New video games aim to be deeper than first-person shooters

Feb 17, 2014

Miguel Oliveira is developing a video game in a tiny apartment near the University of Southern California, worlds away from the high-tech studios of Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo. He works on a laptop surrounded by folding ...

Hidden benefits of computer games

Dec 12, 2013

Computer games can be a popular item on many kids' Christmas wish list. But for some parents, gaming has been linked to a range of negative connotations, from time wasting to promoting violence.

Recommended for you

N. Korea suffers another Internet shutdown

15 hours ago

North Korea suffered an Internet shutdown for at least two hours on Saturday, Chinese state-media and cyber experts said, after Pyongyang blamed Washington for an online blackout earlier this week.

Sony's PlayStation 'gradually coming back'

15 hours ago

Sony was still struggling Saturday to fully restore its online PlayStation system, three days after the Christmas day hack that also hit Microsoft's Xbox, reporting that services were "gradually coming back."

Chattanooga touts transformation into Gig City

15 hours ago

A city once infamous for the smoke-belching foundries that blanketed its buildings and streets with a heavy layer of soot is turning to lightning-fast Internet speeds to try to transform itself into a vibrant ...

Uber broke Indian financial rules: central bank chief

15 hours ago

India's central bank chief lashed out at Uber, already under fire over the alleged rape of a passenger, saying the US taxi-hailing firm violated the country's financial regulations by using an overseas payment ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.