Indians meet to discuss global warming

Dec 07, 2006

An historic event was held this week near the lower Colorado River, with more than 50 U.S. Indian tribes meeting to discuss the global warming crisis.

The Cocopah Indian Tribe and the National Wildlife Federation organized the two-day, initial Tribal Lands Climate Conference that opened Tuesday at the Cocopah reservation near Yuma, Ariz.

The Tribal Lands Climate Conference was an opportunity to unite tribal leaders from across the country with key decision makers in an open forum to discuss actions proactively addressing climate change," said Liz Pratt, a Cocopah Indian Tribe spokeswoman. She said the issues and challenges caused by climate change that were discussed currently affect, and will continue to affect, all tribes on a global scale.

Garrit Voggesser, manager of the National Wildlife Federation's Tribal Lands Conservation Program, said Indians are among the first to experience the devastating impacts of a changing climate, and are uniquely able to compare what's happening today with experiences spanning generations of understanding natural cycles and resources.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers question emergency water treatment guidelines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

European climate at the +2 C global warming threshold

4 hours ago

A global warming of 2 C relative to pre-industrial climate has been considered as a threshold which society should endeavor to remain below, in order to limit the dangerous effects of anthropogenic climate change.

Australia's dirty secret: who's breathing toxic air?

6 hours ago

Australians living in poorer communities, with lower employment and education levels, as well as communities with a high proportion of Indigenous people, are significantly more likely to be exposed to high ...

Predicting bioavailable cadmium levels in soils

23 hours ago

New Zealand's pastoral landscapes are some of the loveliest in the world, but they also contain a hidden threat. Many of the country's pasture soils have become enriched in cadmium. Grasses take up this toxic heavy metal, ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Melting during cooling period

(Phys.org) —A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling ...

Progress in the fight against quantum dissipation

(Phys.org) —Scientists at Yale have confirmed a 50-year-old, previously untested theoretical prediction in physics and improved the energy storage time of a quantum switch by several orders of magnitude. ...