Australia studies work-life balances

Oct 18, 2006

Australian experts say they are developing a practical measure of work-life balance across cultures for use by Australian industries and governments.

The Griffith University-led study will focus on such issues as paid parental leave -- a government-funded entitlement in New Zealand, Britain and other European countries.

Paula Brough, chief investigator and senior lecturer in the university's school of psychology, said conflict between work and family responsibilities costs Australia about $8 billion each year in losses such as staff turnover, absenteeism and health costs.

"Some employees, women in particular, will also scale down their career aspirations to balance work and family," said Brough. "This might be good for the new parents, but it is not necessarily good for the workforce."

One aspect of the study will document the employment experiences of new parents during a three-year period, including monitoring changes in job performance, satisfaction, well-being and aspirations as family responsibilities change.

The study, funded in the latest round of Australian Research Council Discovery projects, will gather evidence from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and China.

"It will provide useful insight into cross-cultural differences between Western individualistic societies and more collectivist Asian societies," Brough said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Budget cuts are harder if people know the benefits of research

Related Stories

New York begins effort to help startups navigate regulations

11 minutes ago

The state attorney general and New York City's chief lawyer announced a new effort Friday to help technology startups understand what regulations they'll need to follow and to help regulators understand what rules might be ...

Recommended for you

Heinz Awards honors six for solving critical human issues

Apr 23, 2015

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher who has developed artificial human "microlivers" that can safely test the toxicity of drugs without endangering lives is one of six people chosen to receive Heinz Awards.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.