New zeolite is discovered

Oct 18, 2006

A Spanish-led team of geologists has reported discovering a porous material with a new, highly open framework structure.

The material found by Avelino Corma and colleagues from the Politecnica University of Valencia is a zeolite, one of a family of materials also known as molecular sieves.

The researchers say the new material exhibits pore systems running in two different directions -- one pore system has extra-large pores (12.2 angstroms) connected crosswise by the second pore system, which has medium-sized pores (6.1 angstroms by 4.3 angstroms).

Zeolites are used in industry to catalyze important reactions, to store and separate gases, and to remove contaminants. The new material, called ITQ-33, has a very high storage capacity and its large pores allow unusual catalytic activity.

In some combinations, the researchers said, the cracking of gas and oil is better when catalyzed by ITQ-33 than by zeolites currently used commercially.

Corma, along with Raul Lobo of the University of Delaware, discovered the unusual conditions needed to synthesize the material using high-throughput techniques that allow chemists to sample a wide range of possible synthesis conditions.

The study appears in the current issue of the journal Nature.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Oxygen levels were only 0.1 percent of today's levels for roughly billion years before rise of animals

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Water purification at the molecular level

23 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Fracking for oil and gas is a dirty business. The process uses millions of gallons of water laced with chemicals and sand. Most of the contaminated water is trucked to treatment plants to be ...

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Oct 29, 2014

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores ...

Energy storage of the future

Oct 20, 2014

Personal electronics such as cell phones and laptops could get a boost from some of the lightest materials in the world.

Recommended for you

NASA sees remnants of Nilofar go to cyclone graveyard

17 hours ago

Wind shear has caused the demise of former Tropical Cyclone Nilofar in the northern Arabian Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Nilofar on Oct. 31 and captured an image that shows strong wind shear has ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.