Algae bloom to be studied in Gulf of Maine

Oct 16, 2006

A new program focused on the southern Gulf of Maine and adjacent New England shelf waters could aid managers of U.S. offshore shellfish beds.

The red tide observation and modeling program was developed by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and colleagues from seven other universities or agencies.

The five-year, $7.5 million project is designed to aid policymakers in deciding whether to re-open, develop, and manage offshore shellfish beds that are presently closed due to the presence of red tide toxins.

Lead investigator Don Anderson of WHOI said the researchers hope to develop a full, regional-scale understanding of such blooms.

"We don't understand the linkages between bloom dynamics and toxicity in waters near shore versus the offshore, nor do we know how toxicity is delivered to the shellfish in those offshore waters," said Anderson. "An additional challenge is the need to expand modeling and forecasting capabilities to include the entire region, and to transition these tools to operational and management use."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

High-CO2 world threatens seabed life

Jun 20, 2014

Environmental change is transforming many parts of the north-east Atlantic seabed, and according to a newly-published paper this will almost certainly get worse in the coming decades.

Energy innovation into a headwind

Sep 10, 2013

The public authorities in Japan are putting all their efforts into establishing a new industry based on floating offshore wind turbines. In Norway we have already developed the technology they need. So researchers ...

Recommended for you

Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

20 hours ago

In a paper published online today in the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature, Northeastern researchers Evan Kodra and Auroop Ganguly found that while global temperature is indeed increasing, so too is the variab ...

Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon

20 hours ago

Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Perú. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change ...

How might climate change affect our food supply?

21 hours ago

It's no easy question to answer, but prudence demands that we try. Thus, Microsoft and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have teamed up to tackle "food resilience," one of several themes ...

Groundwater is safe in potential N.Y. fracking area

21 hours ago

Two Cornell hydrologists have completed a thorough groundwater examination of drinking water in a potential hydraulic fracturing area in New York's Southern Tier. They determined that drinking water in potable ...

User comments : 0