Scientists deny comet collision prediction

Oct 12, 2006

Astronomers at Russia's Pulkovo Observatory are refuting a prediction that a giant comet will collide with the Earth late this month.

Russian astronomer Nikolai Fedorovsky has been quoted as predicting an Oct. 28 collision of a huge comet with Earth, unleashing devastating tsunamis, earthquakes and avalanches, the Russian news agency Novosty reported.

Sergei Smirnov, a spokesman at the observatory located south of St. Petersburg said, "Our research does not support media reports that a comet will collide with the Earth in late October."

He claimed Fedorovsky, who failed to reveal his credentials, is simply seeking publicity.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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