Feds failing to fix the Everglades

Sep 26, 2006

The National Research Council has issued a U.S. Congress-mandated report that criticizes the $10.9 billion campaign to restore Florida's Everglades.

The council said costs are escalating and deadlines are passing without the completion of a single project, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported.

While praising planning and scientific work being put into the project, the council said none of the 10 components scheduled for completion in 2005 has been finished.

"The good news is a firm basis has been laid for the plan," wrote Wayne Huber, professor of civil engineering at Oregon State University and chairman of the 12-member committee. "The bad news is it has taken longer than originally thought. And as a result it will just take that much longer to see an actual restoration benefit to the Everglades."

The report attributes the delay primarily to insufficient spending, by the federal government.

The restoration is being done by the Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District.

Once encompassing 3 million acres, the Everglades has lost about half its land to farms and urban development, the Sun-Sentinel said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Scientists warn Obama of marine life harm from seismic tests

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers spin cotton into capacitive yarn

7 minutes ago

While the pattern for making a wearable fabric battery has already been laid out, it's now time to select the threads that will turn a textile into an energy storage device. That process is being driven by ...

Human and animal interaction identified in the viking age

13 minutes ago

Since 2001, ancient DNA has been used in paleoparasitological studies to identify eggs found in soil samples from prehistoric periods, because identification cannot be done by morphological study alone. The species of human ...

THEMIS camera helps NASA pick site for next Mars lander

16 minutes ago

NASA's next Mars space probe, a lander named InSight, is due to touch down on the Red Planet in September 2016 with a mission focused on the planet's internal properties. Its landing place has been chosen ...

Recommended for you

Coral reefs' physical conditions set biological rules of nature

23 hours ago

Much ecological literature focuses on the effects that human actions have on species, habitats or ecosystems. Unfortunately, human effects on the natural world are often negative. Whether it's deforestation, carbon emissions, plastic pollution or industrialized fishing to na ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.