NOAA tests for Gulf of Mexico contaminates

Oct 26, 2005

U.S. officials say tests of white shrimp samples collected the week of Sept. 12 from the Mississippi Sound found no elevated contaminants.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Wednesday it collected 23 samples of white shrimp from Mobile Bay to Lake Borgne two weeks after Hurricane Katrina hit the U.S. Gulf Coast. The samples were tested for hydrocarbon exposure due to oil spills or urban runoffs, and other contaminants, such as PCBs and DDTs.

Scientists said their analyses found PCB levels les than 5 parts per billion and DDT levels less than 2 ppb -- both well within U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines for consumption.

NOAA also tested samples of shrimp caught prior to Hurricane Katrina and found similarly low levels of toxins.

Federal scientists are currently analyzing samples collected the week of Sept. 26 and on Oct. 17 from areas most likely to have been affected by delayed releases of toxic substances, such as the mouth of the Mississippi River and the western Mississippi Sound, where water from Lake Pontchartrain enters the Gulf of Mexico.

NOAA said it will collect and test samples at least through the end of the year to monitor environmental changes.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: How were fossil tracks made by Early Triassic swimming reptiles so well preserved?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The controversy over interstellar messaging

Feb 20, 2015

Should we beam messages into deep space, announcing our presence to any extraterrestrial civilizations that might be out there? Or, should we just listen? Since the beginnings of the modern Search for Extraterrestrial ...

Recommended for you

Predicting human crowds with statistical physics

Feb 27, 2015

For the first time researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer.

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

Feb 27, 2015

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

Broken windows thesis springs a leak

Feb 27, 2015

The broken windows theory posits that minor misdemeanors, like littering or graffiti spraying, stimulate more serious anti-social behavior. LMU sociologists now argue that the idea is flawed and does not ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.