Phoenician tombs are found in Sicily

Aug 23, 2006

Archaeologists report the discovery of 40 Phoenician sarcophagi in what was once a sacred burial ground in Sicily, near Marsala.

The tombs were found by construction workers excavating the foundations of a house, the Italian news agency ANSA reported.

Archaeologists said the empty sarcophagi were made of simple stone slabs and resembled those found at other Phoenician sites. They were of varying dimensions, some apparently used to bury children.

Also found were several vases of different sizes and shapes that most likely were used during propitiatory rites just before the burial took place, the experts told ANSA.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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