ISS crew to eat 'take out' food

Aug 03, 2006

The International Space Station crew will indulge next week in the ultimate "take-out" food service -- a meal delivered by a NASA space shuttle.

The food was created by chef Emeril Lagasse of the Food Network's "Emeril Live." After tasting several of Lagasse's creations, the three-person crew will talk to the chef during a special communications hookup.

Lagasse sent NASA some of his special recipes for potential use in space. After the required testing and processing, five different meals were selected. Emeril's Mardi Gras jambalaya, mashed potatoes with bacon, green beans with garlic, rice pudding and mixed fruit were delivered to the station aboard the shuttle Discovery in July.

The station is home to NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, Russian cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov and European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Reiter.

"Our research has indicated quality, appetizing food is important for the health and morale of astronauts during space missions, especially long ones," said NASA's Vickie Kloeris, who oversees the development and distribution of food on the space station.

Menu options for shuttle and station crews are more extensive than ever before, with about 200 U.S. food items available in addition to Russian food supplies.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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