In Brief: Mount Etna eruption: no immediate danger

Jul 18, 2006

Italy's Mount Etna -- the largest active volcano in Europe -- erupted for a third-day Monday, sending ash, fire and rocks more than 800 feet into the air.

Etna, nearly 11,000 feet high, is located 18 miles from Catania on Sicily's east coast.

Although several villages lie on its lower slopes, the Italian government said a lava field more than one mile in length was flowing away from them, preventing any immediate danger, The London Telegraph reported.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Significant baseline levels of arsenic found in Ohio soils are due to natural processes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

European climate at the +2 C global warming threshold

5 hours ago

A global warming of 2 C relative to pre-industrial climate has been considered as a threshold which society should endeavor to remain below, in order to limit the dangerous effects of anthropogenic climate change.

Australia's dirty secret: who's breathing toxic air?

7 hours ago

Australians living in poorer communities, with lower employment and education levels, as well as communities with a high proportion of Indigenous people, are significantly more likely to be exposed to high ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Melting during cooling period

(Phys.org) —A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling ...

Meteorites yield clues to Martian early atmosphere

(Phys.org) —Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published ...