Florida Tech launches first student-built rocket from Cape Canaveral

Jun 29, 2006

Amid victory yells, a Florida Institute of Technology student-developed and built Pathfinder vehicle launched yesterday at 2:30 p.m. from Launch Complex 47 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket, dubbed "Panther 1" for the Florida Tech mascot, followed a perfect parabolic path to splash down in the Atlantic as planned. The team, with assistance from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), achieved the first student launch from the site.

The students are involved in Florida's Space Pioneer Cup. This is a university competition to launch a student-designed and built rocket into space and a way to involve students in the "real-world" rocket launch process.

"Future plans for the Pioneer Cup include additional Florida universities in the competition and possibly growth into a national event," said Glenn Vera, deputy director at the Florida Space Authority (FSA). The competition is co-sponsored by the Florida Space Authority and the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing with funding from the Florida Department of Education. Expertise and launch support assistance is also provided by the Florida Space Grant Consortium and the Florida Space Institute.

"We are excited to be involved in developing the next generation of rocket scientists and technicians," said Capt. Winston Scott, executive director of the FSA and a Florida Tech faculty member.

The Florida Tech and ERAU students have developed and flown numerous test vehicles since last year's competition announcement. The universities have also reached out to include high school and middle school students in their projects through tours, program briefings and participation in rocket design reviews.

The FSA is working closely with 45th Space Wing Range Safety to develop a Pioneer Cup rulebook that details the critical design parameters and information, which student teams must supply in order to obtain acceptance for flight on the Eastern Range.

Source: Florida Institute of Technology

Explore further: Solar storm arrives at Earth, but not a problem

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Meet the "swarmies"- robotics' answer to bugs

Aug 22, 2014

(Phys.org) —A small band of NASA engineers and interns is about to begin testing a group of robots and related software that will show whether it's possible for autonomous machines to scurry about an alien ...

GPIM spacecraft to validate use of "green" propellant

Aug 21, 2014

(Phys.org) —Milestone progress is being made in readying NASA's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) for launch in 2016, a smallsat designed to test the unique attributes of a high-performance, non-toxic, ...

Recommended for you

SpaceX's next cargo launch set for Sept 20

Sep 12, 2014

SpaceX's next unmanned cargo trip to restock supplies at the International Space Station is scheduled for September 20, the US space agency said Friday.

Not just cool – it's a gas

Sep 12, 2014

In space, a new way of producing gas is being tested for steering satellites. On Earth, it is now fighting fires without harming the environment – and business insiders say it could be revolutionary.

Solar storm heads Earth's way after double sun blasts

Sep 11, 2014

Two big explosions on the surface of the sun will cause a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm on Earth in the coming days, possibly disrupting radio and satellite communications, scientists said Thursday.

User comments : 0