Bush says global warming 'serious problem'

Jun 26, 2006

U.S. President George W. Bush, asked if he thinks global warming is a significant threat to the Earth, says he believes climate change is a serious problem.

Speaking to reporters at the White House, Bush said, "There's a debate over whether (global warming) is manmade or naturally caused. We ought to get beyond that debate and start implementing the technologies necessary to enable us to achieve a couple of big objectives -- one, be good stewards of the environment; two, become less dependent on foreign sources of oil for economic reasons and for national security reasons."

Bush his administration wants the next generation to be able to drive cars not fueled by hydrogen. He also called for development of safe nuclear power.

"The truth of the matter is, if this country wants to get rid of its greenhouse gases we've got to have the nuclear power industry be vibrant and viable," said Bush. "And so I believe ... I've got a plan to be able to deal with greenhouse gases."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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