Ancient caldera in Apollinaris Patera

Jun 09, 2006
Apollinaris Patera caldera in false color
Apollinaris Patera is an ancient shield volcano measuring approximately 180 by 280 kilometers at its base and rising to a maximum of 5 kilometers above the surrounding terrain. Shield volcanos are large volcanic structures with gently sloping flanks. The caldera of Apollinaris Patera takes the form of a large crater approximately 80 kilometers in diameter. In this false-color image, north is to the right. The image also shows the terrain partly covered by thin, diffuse clouds indicated by bluish-tinted areas. This false-color image was captured on October 26, 2004, by the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard the ESA spacecraft Mars Express with a ground resolution of approximately 11.1 meters per pixel. Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)

These images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, show the caldera of Apollinaris Patera, an ancient, 5-kilometer-high volcano northwest of Gusev Crater.

The HRSC obtained these images during orbit 987 with a ground resolution of approximately 11.1 meters per pixel. The images show part of Apollinaris Patera, a volcano lying at approximately 7.2° South and 174.6° East. Apollinaris Patera is an ancient shield volcano located at the northern edge of the Southern Highlands, lying to the south-east of Elysium Planitia and to the north of Gusev Crater, which is now being explored by NASA's Mars Rover, Spirit.

The volcano measures approximately 180 by 280 kilometers at its base and rises to a maximum of 5 kilometers above the surrounding terrain.

Shield volcanos are large volcanic structures with gently sloping flanks. The caldera of Apollinaris Patera takes the form of a large crater approximately 80 kilometers in diameter and up to 1 kilometer deep. Volcanic calderas are formed when a volcano explodes or when the cone collapses.

In the true-color image, the terrain is partly covered by thin, diffuse, whitish-appearing clouds. In the false-color image, the clouds appear as bluish-tinted areas. The western region of the color image (top of the image, as north is to the right) is characterized by brighter material, which seems to be layered and could be the result of sedimentary deposition. Distinct layering, causing a terrace-like appearance, is also visible east of this brighter material and in the relatively flat region located in the northwest (top right) of the color image.

The color scenes have been derived from the three HRSC-color channels and the nadir channel. The anaglyph image was calculated from the nadir and one stereo channel. Image resolution has been decreased for use on the internet.

Source: European Space Agency

Explore further: Brief moon eclipse coming April 4

Related Stories

Colombia transforms old tires into green housing

4 hours ago

The highlands around the Colombian capital are scattered with small buildings that look like out-of-place igloos but are in fact innovative houses made from the tires that litter the country's roads.

Cassini: Return to Rhea

4 hours ago

After a couple of years in high-inclination orbits that limited its ability to encounter Saturn's moons, NASA's Cassini spacecraft returned to Saturn's equatorial plane in March 2015.

LifePaint spray is Volvo's safety offer for cyclists

4 hours ago

For cyclists sharing the road at dark with cars and pedestrians, a useful motto is to stay safe by staying seen. Volvo, which continues to build on its brand of safety-first, has come out with LifePaint. ...

Recommended for you

Brief moon eclipse coming April 4

1 hour ago

A brief total eclipse of the Moon may be visible on April 4 to skywatchers in western North America, Australia and East Asia, astronomers say.

Total lunar eclipse before dawn on April 4th

22 hours ago

An unusually brief total eclipse of the Moon will be visible before dawn this Saturday, April 4th, from western North America. The eclipse happens on Saturday evening for Australia and East Asia.

Cassini: Return to Rhea

Mar 30, 2015

After a couple of years in high-inclination orbits that limited its ability to encounter Saturn's moons, NASA's Cassini spacecraft returned to Saturn's equatorial plane in March 2015.

Comet dust—planet Mercury's 'invisible paint'

Mar 30, 2015

A team of scientists has a new explanation for the planet Mercury's dark, barely reflective surface. In a paper published in Nature Geoscience, the researchers suggest that a steady dusting of carbon from p ...

It's 'full spin ahead' for NASA soil moisture mapper

Mar 30, 2015

The 20-foot (6-meter) "golden lasso" reflector antenna atop NASA's new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory is now ready to wrangle up high-resolution global soil moisture data, following the successful ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.