Next space shuttle crew has countdown test

Jun 05, 2006
The International Space Station

NASA says the astronauts and ground crews for Space Shuttle Discovery's upcoming mission, STS-121, will hold a countdown test next week.

The "launch dress rehearsal" will be held at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida June 12-15.

The test provides the crew of each shuttle mission with an opportunity to participate in various simulated countdown activities, including equipment familiarization and emergency egress training, NASA said.

The crew members who will take part in the demonstration test are Cmdr. Steve Lindsey; Pilot Mark Kelly; and mission specialists Mike Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Thomas Reiter.

The STS-121 mission to the International Space Station is targeted for July 1 during a launch window that extends to July 19.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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