Nuke plant must clean up radioactive water

May 25, 2006

Officials at Illinois' Braidwood nuclear plant have reportedly been ordered to begin cleaning up groundwater contaminated with radioactive tritium.

The preliminary injunction obtained by state and local officials also orders the plant's operator, the Exelon Corp., to monitor nearby private wells for contamination, The Chicago Sun-Times reported Thursday.

In addition, the court order requires Exelon to provide bottled water to more than 400 homes in the nearby village of Godley until testing determines no wells have been contaminated.

The injunction, issued Wednesday, stems from a law suit filed against Exelon earlier this year to force changes at Braidwood.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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