Controversy surrounds British water plant

May 23, 2006

Critics are reportedly increasing their opposition to the construction of Britain's first plant designed to turn salt water into drinking water.

London Mayor Ken Livingstone says the project should be abandoned because better, cleaner, cheaper and less wasteful alternatives to a $377 million "energy-guzzling and carbon-intensive" desalination plant are needed to cope with London's water shortage, The London Evening Standard reported Tuesday.

Thames Water is appealing Livingstone's decision to block permission for the plant along the north bank of the River Thames. Representatives of the company argue the plant would become an "indispensable" asset, providing the "necessary security and resilience" for London's water supply.

But John Hodgson, representing Livingstone, said, "Every single day Thames Water leaks a staggering 915 million liters (242 million gallons) of clean, purified drinking water from Thames's own pipes -- six-and-one-half times the capacity of the proposed desalination plant -- 800 million liters (211 million gallons) from London itself."

Hodgson also said such a plant would increase global warming by sending more than 150 tonnes (165 tons) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each day -- about 22,600 tonnes (24,912 tons) annually.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: UN sends team to clean up Bangladesh oil spill

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ag-tech could change how the world eats

Dec 14, 2014

Investors and entrepreneurs behind some of the world's newest industries have started to put their money and tech talents into farming - the world's oldest industry - with an audacious agenda: to make sure there is enough ...

The RV Investigator's role in marine science

Dec 12, 2014

We know more about the surface of the moon than we do about our deepest oceans, and only 12% of the ocean floor within Australia's Exclusive Economic Zone has so far been mapped.

Plants with pocket-sized genomes

Dec 12, 2014

Members of Genlisea, a genus of carnivorous plants, possess the smallest genomes known in plants. To elucidate genomic evolution in the group as a whole, researchers have now surveyed a wider range of species, ...

Budget deal takes aim, but misses on climate plans

Dec 11, 2014

A congressional deal to finance the government chips away at some Obama administration energy and environmental programs, but leaves largely intact the president's plans on global warming—at least until Republicans take ...

Fungus-growing ants selectively cultivate their crops

Dec 10, 2014

Ever since agriculture evolved ca 10.000 years ago, plants have been artificially selected to become the fast growing and highly productive varieties we know today. However, humans were not the first to see ...

Recommended for you

UN sends team to clean up Bangladesh oil spill

30 minutes ago

The United Nations said Thursday it has sent a team of international experts to Bangladesh to help clean up the world's largest mangrove forest, more than a week after it was hit by a huge oil spill.

How will climate change transform agriculture?

46 minutes ago

Climate change impacts will require major but very uncertain transformations of global agriculture systems by mid-century, according to new research from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

Report: Radiation leak at nuclear dump was small

52 minutes ago

A final report by independent researchers shows the radiation leak from the federal government's underground nuclear waste repository in southern New Mexico was small and localized.

Confucian thought and China's environmental dilemmas

5 hours ago

Conventional wisdom holds that China - the world's most populous country - is an inveterate polluter, that it puts economic goals above conservation in every instance. So China's recent moves toward an apparent ...

Deforestation threatens species richness in streams

5 hours ago

With a population of 1.3 billion, China is under immense pressure to convert suitable areas into arable land in order to ensure a continued food supply for its people. Accordingly, China is among the top ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.