In Brief: Hawaii notes flaws in Kauai dams

May 21, 2006

Hawaii state inspectors have found all 54 dams on the island of Kauai are potentially dangerous, the Honolulu Star-Bulletin said.

The inspection reports, recently posted online, came after the Ka Loko Dam breached on March 14, killing seven people, the newspaper said.

In a summary of the inspection reports, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers concluded that none of the remaining dams had the potential for immediate breach or collapse.

But Lt. Colonel David Anderson said the results are valid only for the short duration of the inspections. Concerns for dam safety have mainly focused on poor maintenance, grass, bush and tree overgrowth and erosion, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Land-restoration expert cautions: 'Nature never forgets nor forgives'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Bhutan banks on 'white gold' hydropower

Jul 07, 2013

Home to meditating monks and Himalayan nomads, the sleepy kingdom of Bhutan has set its sights on becoming an unlikely energy powerhouse thanks to its abundant winding rivers.

Vietnam may evict bears from 'protected' park land

Nov 14, 2012

(AP)—Bears, some of them blinded or maimed, play behind tall green fences like children at school recess. Rescued from Asia's bear bile trade, they were brought to live in this lush national park, but now ...

Pressure mounts to restore Great Lakes water levels

Oct 02, 2012

Pressure is mounting on the U.S. and Canadian governments to explore ways to restore water levels on Lakes Michigan and Huron that have been lowered nearly 2 feet due to historic dredging on the St. Clair River. The two lakes, ...

Woods, yes, but as before, no

Oct 31, 2011

Though the transformation of farm fields into forests over the past century amounts to a New England conservation victory, a Harvard forest expert said Thursday that turning back the environmental clock and ...

China drought impact widens, reaching Shanghai

May 26, 2011

(AP) -- China's worst drought in a half-century is deepening, with the parched weather that has left millions in the Yangtze River region without enough drinking water pushing inflation higher and adding to widespread power ...

Recommended for you

Study links California drought to global warming

24 minutes ago

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...

Untangling Brazil's controversial new forest code

1 hour ago

Approved in 2012, Brazil's new Forest Code has few admirers. Agricultural interests argue that it threatens the livelihoods of farmers. Environmentalists counter that it imperils millions of hectares of forest, ...

Sea floor conditions mimicked for drilling platforms

5 hours ago

Mobile jack-up drilling platforms used in the oil and gas industry are at risk of rejection before installation due to their use in harsher environments and deeper waters—but University of WA scientists ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Study links California drought to global warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...

Untangling Brazil's controversial new forest code

Approved in 2012, Brazil's new Forest Code has few admirers. Agricultural interests argue that it threatens the livelihoods of farmers. Environmentalists counter that it imperils millions of hectares of forest, ...

Autism Genome Project delivers genetic discovery

A new study from investigators with the Autism Genome Project, the world's largest research project on identifying genes associated with risk for autism, has found that the comprehensive use of copy number variant (CNV) genetic ...

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.